History

History of the Haifa Wastewater Treatment Facility

The Haifa Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility originally constructed in 1961 was the first established in Israel.

The wastewater is treated biologically and is based on a trickling filters and sludge treatment method (see the attached photograph).

The facility was planned at first to serve a population of up to 225,000 and was therefore designed to handle a quantity of no more than 30,000 m³ wastewater per day.

The facility operated for about 10 years based on this design.

In the mid-1970s, the facility was expanded to serve a population of up to 550,000. The facility was thus designed to receive wastewater at an average flow rate of 80,000 m³ per day. A more advanced activated sludge biological treatment system was also added [at that time].

As its service population grew and demands were made for more advanced treatment of wastewater, further activities were undertaken in 1994 to expand and upgrade the facility.

These upgrade activities included transition to the treatment of all the wastewater using the activated sludge method and an increase in the average design flow rate to 120,000 m³ per day.

The following are the basic design parameters that were used in planning the facility expansion:

815,000
Target population:
120,000 m3/day
Average daily flow rate:
150,000 m3/day
Maximum daily flow rate:
9,000 m3/hour
Peak hourly flow rate:
70 tons per day
BOD load:
168 tons per day
COD load:
72 tons per day
Suspended solids load:
10 tons per day
Total nitrogen load:

 

 
Most of the expansion works for the facility [based on the 1994 expansion plan] were concluded in 2002 at a total cost of about NIS 170 million.

The association is currently preparing for an additional upgrade of the facility in order to comply with new more stringent requirements for effluent quality demanded from treatment facilities in Israel.
 
 

The wastewater treatment facility after its construction in 1961. The facility's biological filtration beds, sludge digestion tanks and sludge drying areas can be seen in this picture.